Grandma’s Homemade Hand-Cranked Vanilla Ice Cream

The reason that homemade ice cream has to do with the polarity of water.  Basically the water molecules in your ice cream wan to pull together or coalesce.  Once frozen, the water is stuck in place and the polar ends of the molecules can no longer stick together.  It’s all about making tiny ice crystals.  And you can do it without stabilizers and other chemicals, as they do with the commercial versions of ice cream.

From Florence

Get yourself an old-fashioned hand-crank, 4-5 quart, Ice King or Sterling Freezer ice cream maker from Richmond Cedar Works.  I realize that they are out of production for many years now, so you’ll have to get one second-hand from some place such as eBay, unless you happen to have one passed down the generations to you, but mine still works fine from the 1960’s.  This recipe takes about 45 minutes to make, so make sure you have reinforcements for the hand cranking, as it’ll take at least 2-4 persons to make this recipe (a bunch of kids are even better, as they never run out of cranking abilities).  But seriously, don’t even bother buying an electric ice cream maker (we have and it doesn’t matter what kind or how much you spend) as it’s simply not possible to make the same consistency as home-made and hand-cranked, as the alternatives will always come out watery and less tasty.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 5 eggs
  • 1 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 can Carnation Milk
  • 1 pint whipping cream
  • 3 T. vanilla
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 qt. whole milk
  • 10 lb bag of ice cream salt

Mix all of the ingredients but the last two, so you whip up in a kitchen stand mixer the:

  • 5 eggs
  • 1 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 can Carnation Milk
  • 1 pint whipping cream
  • 3 T. vanilla
  • 1 pinch salt

(Any kind of fresh fruit can be added: strawberries/blue berries/peaches, etc., but we like it vanilla, with the fruit added on top with a bit sugar added in advance to the defrosting fruit to make a fruit syrup)

DIRECTIONS:

Pour mixture into container and add a quart of whole milk.

Lock container in wooden bucket.

Fill nearly to the top of the wood bucket full of snow (or ice cubes) and add coarse salt (the coarse kind like you would put on an ice patch on sidewalk is fine, but ones for ice cream are better as they are free from chemicals, but your salt solution should never touch the ice cream anyway, as it’s in a sealed container), push snow down with a stick around the bucket, and add more salt to container; continue until bucket is full to the top – total use of salt is about 10 pounds; continue turning until done or until it is too difficult to turn any more than a crank or two, at a time–about 45 minutes if you have sufficient ice and salt at all times.

 

ALTERNATE VERSION FOR PINT SIZED CONTAINER (UCO Ice Cream Ball):

Ingredients

  • 1 pint of heavy whipping cream
  • 1 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 egg

Yield: about a pint of smooth and creamy ice cream.

Directions

Mix all the ingredients together in a stand mixer, then put into the ice cream ball, on the ice cream container side.  On the other side, fill the ice portion of the ice cream ball with ice.  Add 1/2 cup ice cream salt (or rock salt) to the ice.  Roll, spin, stir, toss, flip, and shake the ball around for 10 minutes.  Open up the ice cream ball, stir, close ball.  Drain some water from ice section, add more ice and salt.  Roll, spin, stir, toss, flip, and shake for another 10 minutes.  Enjoy your tasty homemade ice cream.