Wingshooting

Check Cords

Check cords should be made of 3/8″ nylon and 20′ in length with a bowline knot and a brass snap. They used to be available from only one gun dog supplier in the south and now this is the closest you will find to the correct stiffness from Cabella’s.

Gary Ruppel demonstrates his famous half-hitch, which is a trick used to acquaint foals with saddling, and it works great on bird dogs to change the point of contact from the collar to the flank.  Gary uses it frequently in teaching heel, whoa, and other commands.  I am always surprised at its effectiveness and the simple fact that few other trainers have learned this technique.

By |July 16th, 2011|Dog Training, Wingshooting|Comments Off on Check Cords

Breeding the Hunting Retreiver by Bill Tarrant Featuring Mike Gould

Here is great magazine article by Bill Tarrant featuring Mike Gould entitled, “Breeding the Hunting Retriever.”

By |July 16th, 2011|Dog Training, Wingshooting|Comments Off on Breeding the Hunting Retreiver by Bill Tarrant Featuring Mike Gould

The Basics of Bird Dog Training – By Bill Tarrant – Featuring Mike Gould

 Here’s another great article by Bill Tarrant featuring trainer Mike Gould. And here’s Part II of the article.

By |July 16th, 2011|Wingshooting|Comments Off on The Basics of Bird Dog Training – By Bill Tarrant – Featuring Mike Gould

Correcting The Bird Dog – Chapter 3 of Problem Gun Dogs by Bill Tarrant featuring Mike Gould

One of my favorite books for dog training is Problem Gun Dogs by Bill Tarrant.

By |July 16th, 2011|Wingshooting|Comments Off on Correcting The Bird Dog – Chapter 3 of Problem Gun Dogs by Bill Tarrant featuring Mike Gould

Basics of Bird Dog Training by Bill Tarrant

Basics of Bird Dog Training article by Bill Tarrant Part I and Part II.

By |July 16th, 2011|Book Reviews, Wingshooting|Comments Off on Basics of Bird Dog Training by Bill Tarrant

Mike Gould’s Whoa Post

This is the Whoa Post we use, as described in this article by Bill Tarrant.

By |July 16th, 2011|Wingshooting|Comments Off on Mike Gould’s Whoa Post

Mike Gould’s Power Bar

This is the Mike Gould power bar, as described in this article by Bill Tarrant.

By |July 16th, 2011|Book Reviews, Wingshooting|Comments Off on Mike Gould’s Power Bar

The Blackberry Farm Cookbook (book review 5/5*****)

Sam Beall, 2009 Clarkson Potter

One reviewer said, “Farm-to-table is one of those irritating culinary trends that is hard to really stay irritated by. Fundamentally, it’s just so darn right: we should be eating seasonally and locally, we should be supporting sustainable agriculture and the preservation of heirloom vegetables. The most delicious food is the stuff that’s been harvested (butchered, cultivated, fished) as close as possible to the kitchen that’s cooking it.”

I find this review troubling.  Why is the idea of farm to table irritating to anyone?  It makes sense.  I believe, it makes sense to everyone, even vegans.  This book is separated into seasons, the seasons of our life–the seasons of our food.  It is about food from Knoxville, Tennessee, a bit dressed up, as the author is the son of the Ruby Tuesday’s restaurant founder.  Not exactly what you would call a hunter-gatherer tradition, but one he seems to now claim.

Anyway, the recipes are separated into seasons, starting with summer’s Blackberry Cobbler and a diatribe on smoking at the Barbie.  But the first one I found interesting was infusing peaches into his BBQ sauce or blackberries.  And I like the southern sweet tea infused with various things from raspberries to blue berries to strawberries, all set to cure in canning jars with the old French lids.

First a discussion on smoke, which is “almost a sacrament below the Mason-Dixon Line.”  Cherokee fires in a pit banked by river rock topped with large joint meat and buried, to wood-fired clay ovens, brick ovens, fireplaces and smokehouses.  From pig cookers welded by locals to kettle grills, the Kamado ( a clay and ceramic style tandoori cooker), to wood cookers and it goes on.

And the explanation of the two kinds of Tennessee fried chicken.    The Kreis’s Tennessee Fire Fried Chicken is worth repeating, which we have adapted for […]

By |July 2nd, 2011|Book Reviews, Fur and Feather, Wingshooting|Comments Off on The Blackberry Farm Cookbook (book review 5/5*****)

Purdey versus Holland & Holland Side by Side Shotguns

Both catalogues arrived this week, one from Purdey and the other from Holland & Holland. 

Tell me how bad the economy really is, when you look at the price of London Best guns each year skyrocketing.  The matched set of the Purdey Side By Side Game Guns going for just £129,000, just $211,126 at the time of writing.  And the matched set of the Holland & Holland ‘Royal” Side by Side Shotguns at £122,500, just $200,557.  

The photography and stories are exquisite.  These are simply the Best London side by side shotguns.

Of particular interest tis the 150th anniversary of The Field Magazine, shotgun with is a side-by-side, round actioned 12-bore embellished with bespoke engraving with flushed pheasants on one side, a fox and hounds on the other, and a stage at the base with a salmon caught in action leaping across the trigger guard.  How about a pair of those?

Purdey produces 70 bespoke guns and rifles a year.  It takes between 18-24 months to complete a Purdey.

By |June 14th, 2011|Wingshooting|Comments Off on Purdey versus Holland & Holland Side by Side Shotguns

Shot Sizes are Not the Same in the UK as the US

 Many of my shooting friends, even those that are well-traveled, are surprised to learn shot shell sizes are not the same everywhere.  So when you read that Lord Ripon was shooting driven pheasants with size 7 shot, it was really an American size 6 shot.  This rich English tradition on even the toughest of driven birds, known for being shot well overhead, when understood in the proper pellet size, undermines a lot of American thought towards bigger shot sizes, longer shells, and more powerful shot shells. 

American Size

 

English Size

 

European Size

Australian Size

 

Pellet Diameter Inches

Pellet Diameter mm

Pellet Weight (grains)

 

Lead Pellets Per Oz.

 

Steel Pellets Per Oz.

11

 

12

 

12

 

 

.062″

1.57

.35

 

1250

 
 

 
 

11

 

11

 

 

.066″

1.68

.42

 

1040

 
 

10

 

10

 

10

10

 

.07″

1.78

.52

 

848

 
 

9 1/2

 
 
 
 
 

 

.075″

1.91

.63

 

688

 
 

9

 

9

 

9

9

 

.08″

2.03

.75

 

568

 
 

8 1/2

 

8

 
 

8

 

.085″

2.21

.97

 

472

 
 

8

 

7

 

8

7.5

 

.09″

2.31

1.29

 

399

 
 

7 1/2

 

6 1/2

 
 

7

 

.095″

2.41

1.46

 

338

 
 

7

 

6

 

7

6

 

.10″

2.59

1.62

 

291

 

423

6

 

5

 

6

5

 

.11″

2.79

1.99

 

218

 

317

5

 

4

 

5

4

 

.12″

3.05

2.57

 

168

 

243

4

 

3

 

4

3

 

.13″

3.25

3.12

 

132

 

192

3

 

2

 

3

2

 

.14″

3.43

3.65

 

106

 

154

2

 

B

 

2

 

 

.15″

3.81

4.38

 

86

 

125

1

 

BB

 

1

BB

 

.16″

4.09

5.47

 

71

 

103

BB

 

A

 
 
 

 

.177″

4.50

6.25

 

55

 

72

BBB

 

AA

 

AA

 

 

.19″

4.83

7.29

 

42

 

61

T

 
 
 

AAA

AAA

 

.20″

5.16

 
 

36

 

53

F

 
 
 
 
 

 

.22″

5.59

 
 

27

 

39

#4 Buck

 
 
 
 
 

 

.24″

6.10

 
 

21

 

30

#3 Buck

 

SSSG

 
 

SSG

 

.25″

6.83

 
 

19

 

28

#1 Buck

 

SSG

 
 
 

 

.30″

7.62

 
 

11

 
 

0

 

SG

 
 

00/SG

 

.32″

8.38

 
 

9

 
 

00

 
 
 
 
 

 

.34″

8.64

 
 

8

 
 

000

 

LG

 
 
 

 

.36″

9.14

 
 

6

 
 

By |May 18th, 2011|Wingshooting|Comments Off on Shot Sizes are Not the Same in the UK as the US