Wingshooting

Ugartechea

For our method of instinctive shooting, we’ll use a side-by-side shotgun, straight stocked with splinter forend.  While a boxlock is surely the prettiest of the side-by-side Best Guns of London, an Anson & Deeley Action (boxlock) will not shoot any different than a sidelock Best Gun.  Most instinctive shooters in our instinctive shooting tradition will be sporting about ¼ inch of cast-off, 1 ½ inch of drop at the comb and about 4 degrees of pitch.  These become the magic wands with which he creates Master Gunners.

Confidence is the key to Master Gunning.  You are a 100% shooter.  You should be hitting 24/25 skeet shots within a year.  You can hit at 65-80 yards, which we practice at the Tower in the school, although it would not be fair to a bird.  I hit 95% during the school. .

While it may vary, I am 5’10” and 175 pounds and have a 13 5/8” or 13 3/4” length of pull, with 2 1/8” or 2 1/4” drop at heel, with 3/8” cast off and 1 ½” at 16” down pitch without a pad or 0-1/2” at 26” with a pad.  Forcing cones are reduced to 2 ½”, with everything polished to final dimensions.

Pattern any gun by taking 10 shots, averaging the results by overlapping the shot spray) at 16 yards on a single sheet of paper.  For each 1” correction on paper, move the stock 1/16 inch in each direction.

12 gauges fits most men’s hands best and with the light loads, it’s effectively a 20 gauge being shot.

20 gauges fits most women best and with the light loads it’s a .28 gauge.  Gun weight in a 20 gauge is ideal at 5 pounds 4 ounces, and a 6 pound gun is too […]

By |September 24th, 2011|Wingshooting|Comments Off on Ugartechea

The Ultimate Field Picnic

I was sent a copy of this article on the ultimate picnic party wagon, which is a proper English wooden trailer converted for tailgating for polo matches.   Polo Magazine- Party Wagon Article. I then discovered Christy’s auction of Patricia Kluge’s estate in Virginia, and found that after the Kluge divorce, John Kluge remarried and built another house nearby.  This incredible picnic hamper is the piece de resistance  of the auction.  click article from the New York Times which appeared in December 2005.

Apparently in the 1980’s by the Kluges commissioned the London firm of Asprey, jewellers and silversmith to the British Royal Family, to fashion this picnic hamper containing a full service for sixteen. The wicker trailer holds some 15 wicker cases, each fitted with brass handles and leather straps, with battery-powered hot and cold boxes and a water pump, cases for Bernardaud Limoges china, Baccarat crystal, Asprey silver cutlery, a staghorn bar service, two folding mahogany tables and 16 chairs, complete with the “K” monogram.  The set was estimated at $20,000 to $30,000 and sold for some $144,000.

Although  wicker carryalls have been used since the 1700s, the picnic basket was born in 1901, when British luxury-goods retailers like Asprey started stocking hampers filled with tableware for motorists to enjoy on country drives.  See more at http://driven.urbandaddy.com/2011/08/17/meals-on-wheels/ and http://www.finesse-fine-art.com/Picnic/PicnicArticle.htm.

By |September 13th, 2011|Cuisine, Fishing, Foxhunting, Picnic, polo, Uncategorized, Wingshooting|Comments Off on The Ultimate Field Picnic

Check Cords

Check cords should be made of 3/8″ nylon and 20′ in length with a bowline knot and a brass snap. They used to be available from only one gun dog supplier in the south and now this is the closest you will find to the correct stiffness from Cabella’s.

Gary Ruppel demonstrates his famous half-hitch, which is a trick used to acquaint foals with saddling, and it works great on bird dogs to change the point of contact from the collar to the flank.  Gary uses it frequently in teaching heel, whoa, and other commands.  I am always surprised at its effectiveness and the simple fact that few other trainers have learned this technique.

By |July 16th, 2011|Dog Training, Wingshooting|Comments Off on Check Cords

Breeding the Hunting Retreiver by Bill Tarrant Featuring Mike Gould

Here is great magazine article by Bill Tarrant featuring Mike Gould entitled, “Breeding the Hunting Retriever.”

By |July 16th, 2011|Dog Training, Wingshooting|Comments Off on Breeding the Hunting Retreiver by Bill Tarrant Featuring Mike Gould

The Basics of Bird Dog Training – By Bill Tarrant – Featuring Mike Gould

 Here’s another great article by Bill Tarrant featuring trainer Mike Gould. And here’s Part II of the article.

By |July 16th, 2011|Wingshooting|Comments Off on The Basics of Bird Dog Training – By Bill Tarrant – Featuring Mike Gould

Correcting The Bird Dog – Chapter 3 of Problem Gun Dogs by Bill Tarrant featuring Mike Gould

One of my favorite books for dog training is Problem Gun Dogs by Bill Tarrant.

By |July 16th, 2011|Wingshooting|Comments Off on Correcting The Bird Dog – Chapter 3 of Problem Gun Dogs by Bill Tarrant featuring Mike Gould

Basics of Bird Dog Training by Bill Tarrant

Basics of Bird Dog Training article by Bill Tarrant Part I and Part II.

By |July 16th, 2011|Book Reviews, Wingshooting|Comments Off on Basics of Bird Dog Training by Bill Tarrant

Mike Gould’s Whoa Post

This is the Whoa Post we use, as described in this article by Bill Tarrant.

By |July 16th, 2011|Wingshooting|Comments Off on Mike Gould’s Whoa Post

Mike Gould’s Power Bar

This is the Mike Gould power bar, as described in this article by Bill Tarrant.

By |July 16th, 2011|Book Reviews, Wingshooting|Comments Off on Mike Gould’s Power Bar

The Blackberry Farm Cookbook (book review 5/5*****)

Sam Beall, 2009 Clarkson Potter

One reviewer said, “Farm-to-table is one of those irritating culinary trends that is hard to really stay irritated by. Fundamentally, it’s just so darn right: we should be eating seasonally and locally, we should be supporting sustainable agriculture and the preservation of heirloom vegetables. The most delicious food is the stuff that’s been harvested (butchered, cultivated, fished) as close as possible to the kitchen that’s cooking it.”

I find this review troubling.  Why is the idea of farm to table irritating to anyone?  It makes sense.  I believe, it makes sense to everyone, even vegans.  This book is separated into seasons, the seasons of our life–the seasons of our food.  It is about food from Knoxville, Tennessee, a bit dressed up, as the author is the son of the Ruby Tuesday’s restaurant founder.  Not exactly what you would call a hunter-gatherer tradition, but one he seems to now claim.

Anyway, the recipes are separated into seasons, starting with summer’s Blackberry Cobbler and a diatribe on smoking at the Barbie.  But the first one I found interesting was infusing peaches into his BBQ sauce or blackberries.  And I like the southern sweet tea infused with various things from raspberries to blue berries to strawberries, all set to cure in canning jars with the old French lids.

First a discussion on smoke, which is “almost a sacrament below the Mason-Dixon Line.”  Cherokee fires in a pit banked by river rock topped with large joint meat and buried, to wood-fired clay ovens, brick ovens, fireplaces and smokehouses.  From pig cookers welded by locals to kettle grills, the Kamado ( a clay and ceramic style tandoori cooker), to wood cookers and it goes on.

And the explanation of the two kinds of Tennessee fried chicken.    The Kreis’s Tennessee Fire Fried Chicken is worth repeating, which we have adapted for […]

By |July 2nd, 2011|Book Reviews, Fur and Feather, Wingshooting|Comments Off on The Blackberry Farm Cookbook (book review 5/5*****)